Pupil Premium & COVID Catch Up Funding

The Covid-19 crisis put an unexpected handbrake on the academic year. While teaching staff, schools and other professionals put in an unprecedented effort to keep educating pupils throughout lockdown, there have been concerns around learning loss as pupils return to the classroom. To help mitigate this, the Prime Minister and Education Secretary announced in June a £1 billion Covid-19 “catch-up” package, designed to tackle the impact of lost teaching time.

What is catch-up tuition funding and how can it be utilised in schools?

The Covid-19 crisis put an unexpected handbrake on the academic year. While teaching staff, schools and other professionals put in an unprecedented effort to keep educating pupils throughout lockdown, there have been concerns around learning loss as pupils return to the classroom. To help mitigate this, the Prime Minister and Education Secretary announced in June a £1 billion Covid-19 “catch-up” package, designed to tackle the impact of lost teaching time.

 

What is catch-up tuition funding?

As part of the £1bn package, the government has released £650 million to help pupils in England catch-up on learning they have missed while schools were closed. The funding is available from September and will be shared across state primary and secondary schools over the 2020/21 academic year. The government expects this will be spent on small group tuition, but ultimately teachers will be able to decide how the money is spent.

Who is eligible for the catch-up funding?

The £650 million in universal catch-up funding is available to:
• Primary, secondary and all through local authority-maintained schools, academies and free schools
• Local authority-maintained special schools
• Special academies and free schools
• Special schools not maintained by a local authority
• Pupil referral units
• Alternative provision academies and free schools
• Local authority-maintained hospital schools and academies
• Independent special schools

In mainstream schools from reception to year 11, the funding solution is capped at £80 per pupil. In special schools, alternative provision and hospital schools this is £240 per pupil. Payments will be made to schools in three tranches in September, January and May. There is also a 16 to 19 fund for small group tutoring activity in school six forms, colleges and other providers where disadvantaged 16 to 19 students have had their studies disrupted as a result of Covid-19.

How can the catch-up tuition funding streams be used?

Although schools have the flexibility to determine the best way to spend their funding according to their circumstances, they have been instructed to act in line with guidance on curriculum expectations for the 2020/2021 academic year. Schools should look to the Education Endowment Foundation’s support guide for evidence-based approaches to help direct the funding in the most effective way. According to the guide, the best way for children to catch-up quickly is through one-to-one and small group tuition.

School leaders must be able to account for how the funding is being used in line with the goal of getting education back on track as quickly as possible. Note that the grant will only be available for the 2020/2021 academic year and should be used to fund specific activities to support pupils catching up on lost teaching during lockdown.

Please click on this link to find out more about how Brockley is using this funding effectively to ensure children ‘catch up’. This plan is an over view for general publication , a more detailed and child specific plan is available to staff.

Catch Up Funding Plan 2020 published

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April 2018 Changes to EYPP

Please find attached an information leaflet which explains the recent changes to the eligibility for the early education entitlement for two year olds and the Early Years Pupil Premium under Universal Credit. 

Click here to download the leaflet: EYPP

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The information below outlines how we use the Pupil Premium Money to support the learning of children in our school.

What is the Pupil Premium? The National Picture…

The Pupil Premium was introduced by the Government in April 2011. It was designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. For example, national figures show that 11 year olds who are eligible for Free School Meals are around twice as likely not to achieve age related expectations in maths and English as other 11 year olds.

Where does the money come from..?

Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of children who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals, whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and children who have been looked after in local authority care continuously for more than six months.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to help schools to provide targeted support for vulnerable children- not necessarily just children who qualify for FSM.

“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools…. is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.” (Source – DfE website)

The funding is therefore given to schools to spend as they think best, although there is a requirement to publish online how this money is spent.

For more details on the Pupil Premium please visit:
http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/premium

Pupil Premium at Brockley Primary School…

At Brockley Primary School, we are committed to ensuring all our children make the best possible progress. We track the achievement of every child on a regular basis and do all we can to make sure each child achieves their potential. We also have a duty to ensure that no groups of children are disadvantaged due to their gender, ethnic origin or family income or background.

We are well staffed at Brockley Primary School and children in all year groups learn in classes where the staff team includes a teacher and support staff. Children are familiar with working in groups of different sizes, at different times of the day, with different adults. Children of all abilities have the opportunity to work on a 1:1 basis or in a small group with an adult. Within this type of organisation, we do give children extra support when they need it.

The Pupil Premium funding has allowed us to continue and extend what we already do – to monitor children’s progress and to give additional support or challenge. Children are certainly not singled out or stigmatised for getting some extra attention and we would never label a child in front of other children for receiving free school meals or being in care.

To find out how we spend the Pupil Premium Funding click on the link below:

Click here for our Pupil Premium Statement: brockley PPG strategy statement 19-20

PPF Strategy 17-18 – Click here for our 2018 review and plan

Pupil Premium Strategy Revised September 2017  – Pupil Premium Strategy 2017 website

Pupil Premium Strategy – January 2017

pupil-premium-funding-statement – January 2017

An overview of spending.

pupil-premium-grant-overview-2016 January 2016

Information regarding an external review of Pupil Premium Funding.

View our Brockley Primary School Pupil Premium Review – January 2016

External Review of Pupil Premium Funding 2015

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